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Military History

Online Master of Arts in Military History (MA)

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$0 Application Fee
$0 Transfer Credit Evaluation
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About This Program

American Military University’s (AMU) master’s in military history provides deep insight into military strategy, command, and leadership tactics as well as warfare that shaped future civilizations.

AMU is proud of its legacy, founded to serve military members. This master’s degree in military history covers:

  • Technological advances in weaponry that impacted pivotal battles in history
  • Social structures
  • Military attitudes
  • Organizational relationships between officers and troops
  • Relationships between military members and civilians

AMU’s military history master’s program faculty includes military leaders and published historians who share their unique perspectives.

What You Will Do

  1. Learn about individuals, events, and the global complexity of human experiences over time and place
  2. Evaluate primary sources and secondary resources to deeply research the past, analyzing for credibility, position, and perspective
  3. Develop research that adds original contributions to the body of knowledge, using advanced historical methods
  4. Use persuasive arguments that are reasoned and based on suitable evidence
  5. Produce a research paper that meets professional standards required for a conference presentation or academic publication

View Program Outcome Assessment Results

Degree at a Glance

Number of Credits
36
Cost Per Credit
$370 | $250*
Courses Start Monthly
Online

Program Requirements Printable Catalog Version

Students must choose a concentration for this degree program:

This Concentration in American Military History focuses on the major conflicts from the Revolution to the Cold War period. The course selection includes the methodology and historiography of the military periods under study and an examination of theoretical concepts including the nature of warfare, strategy, and leadership as well as civil-military relations and foreign relations. The courses offer students a clear understanding of key historical events and human behavior in relation to the history of American warfare including the economics, politics, and social issues.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this program students will be able to:

  • Analyze the characteristics of leadership common to great military leaders and decision-making skills that are inbred and/or learned by the great leaders throughout military history.
  • Dissect and critique the American Revolution from its antecedents to its legacy including events leading to the revolt, Declaration of Independence, strategy and tactics, campaigns, and the aftermath of war on the new nation.
  • Discern and assess the political, economic, cultural, social, and military aspects of the Civil War specifically including their impact on causative factors, conduct of the war, and post-war aftermath.
  • Compare and contrast all theaters of World War II and events in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Southeast and Southwest Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America as well as the role of diplomacy and strategy, the impact of war upon society, and the fighting on land, at sea, and in the air.
  • Examine the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States with emphasis on the actual scene of superpower conflict in the Third World and an analysis of the varied levels of power and their interrelationships that made the Cold War unique.

Must take all courses for this section.

Course ID: 4492

|
This course addresses the War for American Independence from the outset in April 1775 with the events at Concord and Lexington, Massachusetts through the return of the British main force to New York in the summer of 1778 to the final victory at Yorktown. The course analyzes not only the specific events - battles, campaigns, and engagements - but also addresses the nature of strategic decision-making, political issues, leadership, and nature of the opposing forces as well as the context of the War for American Independence in general.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session

Course ID: 2656

|
This course is a study of the political, economic, cultural, and social aspects of the Civil War as a seminal event in our nation’s history. Students explore the causes of the war, how a nation coped with the struggle across multiple dimensions, and how we dealt with the conflict's aftermath. Special emphasis is on the continuing debate that the impact of the Civil War had on both the North and the South.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3808

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This course examines the origins of World War I; the combatants, strategy and tactics, technological innovation vs. conservatism; the war in France; the war at sea; America's role; the peace settlement; and the occupation. While military aspects of the conflict are studied, the primary focus places the Great War in the context of European and World history, and specific areas include political and diplomatic developments, new developments in weapons technology, economic aspects of the war, and the impact of the war on the culture and social order of the nations involved in the struggle.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3277

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This course is a global history of the Second World War. Emphasis is on the theaters of war and related events in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Southeast and Southwest Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America in relation to their impact on the national and military objectives. In this context, students compare and contrast the economies, industry, society, and culture of the United States, Great Britain, Japan, and Germany as major participants during the war. The role of diplomacy and strategy, the impact of war upon society, and the fighting on land, at sea, and in the air are also examined in terms of modern warfare.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 4256

|
Preparation for the Master of Arts in History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. This course should be the LAST course in your program prior to HIST699 and should not be taken earlier in your program.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3419

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This course is a seminar on the US-USSR Cold War period, which dominated geopolitics and military affairs from the end of World War II to the fall of the Berlin Wall, as well as the first decade of the post-Cold War era culminating with the events of 9/11. Students assess military conflicts and confrontations between the United States, Soviet Union, and their respective allies in the years since 1945. Focus is on the proxy wars of the US and USSR to include wars of national liberation in Africa, Asia, and Latin America; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the Indo-Pakistani conflict; and post-Cold War conflicts in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3264

|
This seminar examines the origins, evolution and impact of the Vietnam War. In addition to reviewing the history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam, students explore the political, cultural and social forces and military developments that shaped the behavior of the various Vietnamese and American parties. Purpose is to develop a coherent perspective on what became one of the costliest and most divisive wars in American history.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

APUS offers one of the nation’s only graduate concentrations on the American Revolution. Students study the philosophies, personalities, strategies, leadership, and other factors that led to, influenced, and resulted from the United States of America’s foundation and permanent break from Great Britain. As a major event in the larger sweep of the Enlightenment, the following aspects of the American Revolution are analyzed: principles of colonialism, monarchy, democracy, republic, and nation-building; military leadership, strategies and individual soldiers on each side; international diplomacy; economics; and American culture.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this program students will be able to:

  • Dissect and critique the American Revolution from its antecedents to its legacy including events leading to the revolt, Declaration of Independence, strategy and tactics, campaigns, and the aftermath of war on the new nation.
  • Analyze the American Revolution in reference to the operational contributions of American and British military leadership using selected land battles as examples of the strategies and tactics involved.
  • Evaluate an early and pivotal campaign in the American Revolution by critiquing the strategy, tactics, and results of campaign on the subsequent course of the Revolution and post-war Anglo-American relations.
  • Explain the perspective of the American Revolution from the British viewpoint in relation to colonial policies, diplomacy, military leadership, and other influences in Great Britain during and after the war.
  • Assess and critique the conclusive military strategy of the American Revolution and why the strategy was distinctive from other military theatres of operation.

Must take all courses for this section.

Course ID: 4661

|
This course will examine the political and social history of the thirteen colonies, including their European background, settlement and expansion, beginnings of culture, and the imperial context. Additionally, students will study the social consequences of colonization, migration, and war in America from 1500-1775, including the interaction of British colonists with competing European cultures (French, Dutch, Portuguese, and Spanish), with Native Americans, and with African and Afro-American slaves. The course will also include consideration of the pan-Atlantic context of Early America, cross-cultural contacts, family and gender, labor systems, religious observations, crime, and other themes explored in recent social and cultural theory. (Recommended Prerequisites: HIST500 and HIST501)
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 3260

|
This course is a comprehensive study of the “first global war” as events unfolded in Europe, North America, the Indian sub-continent, and on the seas during the 18th century. Students discern, as a prelude to the American Revolution, how the practice of warfare among the eighteenth century nations was firmly established among European nations. In the distrust and distaste among the French, British, and Americans, the Seven Years War set a pattern that has remained central to the American way of understanding our colonial history.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session

Course ID: 3261

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This course is a comparative study to demonstrate the importance of the historical context of any great military event. Context includes all aspects of a society or culture and in this case, 18th century British and colonial American political and constitutional philosophies, social norms and societal structure, economics, religious concepts, and foreign and diplomatic policy. Students examine issues such as divergent historiographical opinions on the degree of American constitutional conservatism versus political and social radicalism, and the nature of the soldiery of the continental Army.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3263

|
This course is an examination of the American Revolution with emphasis on the operational contributions of American and British military leadership. Students assess the basic concepts and principles of the war’s strategic and operational levels, the tactical employment of forces, and the element of leadership to the planning and execution of the war by both sides. Special emphasis is on comparing and contrasting American and British peer-level commanders.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 4256

|
Preparation for the Master of Arts in History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. This course should be the LAST course in your program prior to HIST699 and should not be taken earlier in your program.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3262

|
This course details the British view of the Revolution and the long hidden perspective of the American Revolution. Topics include British colonial politics, diplomacy, political and military leadership, factors of influence in Great Britain during the Revolution, and post-war views of America.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 4492

|
This course addresses the War for American Independence from the outset in April 1775 with the events at Concord and Lexington, Massachusetts through the return of the British main force to New York in the summer of 1778 to the final victory at Yorktown. The course analyzes not only the specific events - battles, campaigns, and engagements - but also addresses the nature of strategic decision-making, political issues, leadership, and nature of the opposing forces as well as the context of the War for American Independence in general.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session

Often referred to as the "seminal event" in American history, this program studies the political, cultural, economic, and military issues related to the War Between the States. The degree covers (1) major figures, such as Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee and Ulysses S. Grant, (2) obscure figures unknown to the casual observer yet critical to how one understands of the war, and (3) minor figures that are rarely provided the coverage deserved of history such as the common soldier on each side of the conflict. The major campaigns are analyzed using cutting edge texts and professors’ expert analyses. The war itself is viewed in context; the issues leading up to it and resulting from it are critically analyzed. Graduates of the program can expect to be on their way to becoming "experts" in the Civil War; several graduates of this program have published books and/or articles related to the war.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this program students will be able to:

  • Place events of the Antebellum period, the Civil War, and Reconstruction into the broader scope of American History by assessing the similarities and differences in social, cultural, economic, and political developments in North and South.
  • Discern and assess the political, economic, cultural, social, and military aspects of the Civil War to specifically include their impact on causative factors, conduct of the war, and post-war aftermath.
  • Examine the operational contributions of Union and Confederate military leaders by critiquing selected land battles of the war as examples of the strategies and tactics involved.
  • Compare and contrast the national, theater, and operational command structures of the Union and Confederacy in relation to leadership styles of key military leaders on both sides and the evolution of command and control during the war.
  • Identify, assess, and explain the diverse historical assessments and interpretations of the Antebellum, Civil War, and Reconstruction eras as presented in the writings of prominent and influential historians.

Must take all courses for this section.

Course ID: 2659

|
This course is an analysis of the conditions existing in the United States in the first half of the 19th century. The course focuses on the political, cultural/social, economic, security, leadership, and other issues that played roles in starting and shaping the Civil War. Students will analyze the issues in the context of war and peace to determine whether or not such conflicts as civil wars can be avoided prior to their inception.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 2656

|
This course is a study of the political, economic, cultural, and social aspects of the Civil War as a seminal event in our nation’s history. Students explore the causes of the war, how a nation coped with the struggle across multiple dimensions, and how we dealt with the conflict's aftermath. Special emphasis is on the continuing debate that the impact of the Civil War had on both the North and the South.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 2657

|
This course is a study of the American Civil War with emphasis on operational contributions of Union and Confederate military leadership. Students examine Civil War battles on two levels: the strategic doctrine as formed by the major commanders and tactical developments that affected the conduct of battle at a lower echelon of command. Special emphasis is on the interplay between these levels in order to gain a comprehensive view of strategy and tactics in both armies from 1861-1865.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 2658

|
This course is a study of national, theater, and operational command structures of the Union and Confederacy, the leadership styles of key military leaders on both sides, and the evolution of command and control in the war. Major themes include the relationship between the commanders in chief and the generals who led the armies in the field, the relationships between the generals themselves, and the ways in which the relationships described above either served to facilitate or debilitate the causes those commanders served.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 4256

|
Preparation for the Master of Arts in History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. This course should be the LAST course in your program prior to HIST699 and should not be taken earlier in your program.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 4494

|
This course examines the theory, practice and operations of the cavalry and intelligence gathering and analysis on both sides during the Civil War. The first part will cover the development of the mounted arm and its traditional role. The theory of cavalry tactics taught by West Point will provide a knowledge base for the ideas and developed tactics by Civil War officers. The second part will address personalities, to include Nathan Bedford Forrest, Jeb Stuart, Wade Hampton, John Buford, George Custer, and others. Areas investigated, relevant to intelligence, will include espionage, Bureau of Military Information, secret services, cavalry forays, covert activities, and secret missions (including the Lincoln assassination plot). Focus of the course will be to compare and contrast the efforts of both the Union and Confederacy to stay ahead in the game of "knowing the enemy."
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 2661

|
This course is designed to examine the interrelationship between the Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson and the U.S. Congress, compare/contrast the Reconstruction plans developed by both, and determine why the Reconstruction Period played out in the manner that it did.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Students in the World War II concentration study the history, politics, leaders, strategies, and campaigns under which the 20th century's history, (and some would argue, the modern world's), seminal events unfolded. The World War II student takes a course of study that includes study of the major political and military leaders of both Allied and Axis powers as well as study of the war's major theaters. Students then have the opportunity to study of major and lesser campaigns and battles, military strategy and leadership, and World War II political and military institutions.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this program students will be able to:

  • Discern and critique the strategies, tactics, leaders and lessons learned during the fighting in the China-Burma-India Theater, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, the Aleutians, and in the Philippines.
  • Explain and assess the strategy, tactics and leadership from the blitzkriegs into France, the Balkans, and the Soviet Union to the campaigns in North Africa and Italy.
  • Explain and assess the Allied victory in Europe to include the generalship and decisions concerning the amphibious invasions, airdrops, and the crossing of the Rhine.
  • Distinguish the politics, political leadership, and diplomacy in Germany, Japan, and Italy that enabled the rise of the respective countries’ Axis leadership that ruled during World War II.
  • Distinguish the political leadership that defined the Allied powers of the United States, Great Britain, and Russia before, during, and after World War II.

Must take all courses for this section.

Course ID: 3277

|
This course is a global history of the Second World War. Emphasis is on the theaters of war and related events in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Southeast and Southwest Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America in relation to their impact on the national and military objectives. In this context, students compare and contrast the economies, industry, society, and culture of the United States, Great Britain, Japan, and Germany as major participants during the war. The role of diplomacy and strategy, the impact of war upon society, and the fighting on land, at sea, and in the air are also examined in terms of modern warfare.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3417

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This course examines the Allied victory in Europe in World War II. Students assess how the American Army, trained for speed and mobility, performed during campaigns in Italy, France and Germany. The focus is on Eisenhower's generals and their decisions concerning amphibious invasions (e.g., Sicily, Salerno, Anzio and Omaha Beach), airdrops (e.g., Italy and Holland), the race across France and slogging through Italy (e.g., the Gothic siege line and the Huertgen Forest), as well as counter strokes such as Monte Cassino and the Ardennes Bulge.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3254

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This course is a comprehensive analysis of the fighting during World War II in the China-Burma-India Theater, New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, the Aleutians, and the Philippines. Students assess the amphibious campaigns in the central Pacific theatre and evaluate the impact of one of the most massive movements of men and arms in history. Primary focus is on land warfare, its strategies, tactics, leaders and lessons learned.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session

Course ID: 4493

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This course is an in-depth study of the politics, political leadership, and diplomacy that defined the Axis and Allied Powers during World War II. Topics address the factors that facilitated their rise to power; the key political structures, relations, and personalities; the inter-Axis relations among political elites versus the Allied powers; and the diplomatic efforts employed by the Axis powers as they postured against the Allies and the rest of the world during the war.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 4256

|
Preparation for the Master of Arts in History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. This course should be the LAST course in your program prior to HIST699 and should not be taken earlier in your program.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 4513

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This course is an analysis of the German-Soviet campaign during World War II. Students will examine the three major phases of this conflict that begins with the Wehrmacht invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, urban warfare in Stalingrad in the fall of 1942, and history’s largest tank battle at Prohorovka in 1943. Finally, this course will detail the Soviet counterattack across the Vistula and Oder Rivers that ended with the die Gotterdammerung in Berlin.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3083

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This course offers a study of the origins and history of the Holocaust within National Socialist Germany and throughout Eastern Europe. Students examine the organizations involved at the grass roots level as well as the escalation of events from open murder to the implementation of concentration and death camps. Topics include the birth of National Socialism through the final days of the Holocaust, including the political, social, economic and scientific contributions during the Third Reich.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Students will focus on the American culture of war from World War II to the present. It traces the history and evolution of American strategic, operational, and tactical doctrine during the Cold War as well as United Nations peace-keeping operations in this time period. Topics cover national security interests including foreign policy and military operations and their relation to domestic political, economic, and social components as well as the major foreign wars and the emergence of the United States as a world power. In addition, students have the opportunity to examine our response to selected regional issues in the Balkans, Middle East, and other threat situations in the world.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this program, students will be able to:

  • Examine the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States with emphasis on the actual scene of superpower conflict in the Third World and an analysis of the varied levels of power and their interrelationships that made the Cold War unique.
  • Contrast the evolution and functioning of United Nations peacekeeping operations during the Cold War period to include comparative assessments of each peacekeeping operation as a tool of conflict management.
  • Analyze of the origins and structures of insurgency and revolution to include the actual history of specific groups of insurgents and revolutionaries such as the Chinese Communists, the Viet Minh/Viet Cong, and the militant Islamist insurgents.
  • Assess great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990s and extraordinary security enjoyed by the great and middle powers of the Western world in the Cold War's aftermath.
  • Evaluate turbulent areas in the history of the world with emphasis on modern political and military issues including the Balkans, Israel, Iraq, Afghanistan, and other regions.

Must take all courses for this section.

Course ID: 3418

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This course is a seminar in global conflict and confrontations since the end of World War II. Students assess specific military conflicts since 1945 to include limited wars by the United States and Soviet Union; counterinsurgencies and wars of national liberation; the Arab-Israeli conflict; post-Cold War conflicts; and conflict post-9/11. Recommended prior to enrolling in MILH 621, The Cold War and Its Aftermath, and MILH 622, Great Power Military Interventions, which cover the Cold War period in greater detail.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3419

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This course is a seminar on the US-USSR Cold War period, which dominated geopolitics and military affairs from the end of World War II to the fall of the Berlin Wall, as well as the first decade of the post-Cold War era culminating with the events of 9/11. Students assess military conflicts and confrontations between the United States, Soviet Union, and their respective allies in the years since 1945. Focus is on the proxy wars of the US and USSR to include wars of national liberation in Africa, Asia, and Latin America; the Arab-Israeli conflict; the Indo-Pakistani conflict; and post-Cold War conflicts in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3420

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This course is an in-depth seminar on the military interventions of the United States and Soviet Union/Russia since the end of World War II. Students examine the military interventions of the United States and Soviet Union/Russia. Special emphasis includes the analysis of military interventions in Greece, Korea, Suez, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Somalia, Chechnya, and Iraq.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session

Course ID: 3230

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This course examines the military history of the region known as the Balkans and explores the turbulence behind long standing political, religious, and economic issues. Students assess the post-World War II era from 1945 to the present, by focusing on past and present conflicts and confrontations, UN and NATO interventions, transitions in government, and the pursuit of stability within the European community. Special emphasis is on further research into the rise and fall of Yugoslavia and emerging new states.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 4256

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Preparation for the Master of Arts in History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on their research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. This course should be the LAST course in your program prior to HIST699 and should not be taken earlier in your program.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3468

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This course examines the Middle East peace process surrounding the Arab-Israeli conflict and focuses on the historical perspectives, the roles of the various Middle Eastern countries in the process, Western intervention efforts, and the inherent successes and failures over the years. Purpose is to develop a comprehensive understanding of the background and history of conflict resolution, the hope for peace in the future, and the ability of the various nations to coexist.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
12/28/21 - 06/03/22 06/06/22 - 07/31/22 Spring 2022 Session D 8 Week session
03/29/22 - 09/02/22 09/05/22 - 10/30/22 Summer 2022 Session D 8 Week session
06/28/22 - 12/02/22 12/05/22 - 01/29/23 Fall 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 3264

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This seminar examines the origins, evolution and impact of the Vietnam War. In addition to reviewing the history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam, students explore the political, cultural and social forces and military developments that shaped the behavior of the various Vietnamese and American parties. Purpose is to develop a coherent perspective on what became one of the costliest and most divisive wars in American history.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Must take all courses for this section.

Course ID: 3252

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This course examines the military heritage of the United States from the colonial period to the present time. Through an in-depth study of the extensive literature in American military history, students assess the key individuals, military policies, postures, organizations, strategies, campaigns, tactics, and battles that define the American military experience.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Course ID: 3631

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The course addresses the development of core research skills for advanced historical study. Through case studies analyses, the evaluation of different types of historical evidence, and the consideration of how valid research questions are formulated and applied, it is designed to refine the critical thinking, research, and writing skills that are fundamental to valid historical scholarship.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3630

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This course is the study of historical thought from its emergence in the classical world to the present. Students concentrate on how history has been interpreted, rather the facts of history themselves as well as contemplate the fundamental questions about the nature of history, and investigate the relationships between theory and evidence in historical writing. Emphasis is on the narratives historians have used to reconstruct the past, and the major historiographical schools of thought that have developed over time.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 01/30/22 Fall 2021 Session D 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 04/03/22 Winter 2022 Session I 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 05/29/22 Spring 2022 Session B 8 Week session

Course ID: 3251

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This course examines the origin and development of military concepts and ideas by studying the wisdom of the great military thinkers of the past. Among the philosophers are Sun Tzu and Machiavelli, Clausewitz and Jomini, Mahan and Corbett, Douhet and Mitchell, T.E. Lawrence, and the counterinsurgency theorist and practitioner David Galula. Students compare and contrast these great thinkers to gain an understanding of the nature and conduct of war at the strategic, operational, and tactical levels.
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 12/26/21 Fall 2021 Session I 8 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 02/27/22 Winter 2022 Session B 8 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 05/01/22 Winter 2022 Session D 8 Week session

Must take all courses for this section.

Course ID: 3424

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Preparation for the Master of Arts in Military History Capstone (Thesis) seminar begins on day one of a student's graduate program of study. The theories, research methods and analytical skills, and substantive knowledge obtained through their master's curriculum provide the basis for the thesis project. Students are required to develop primary and secondary source materials on the research topic and address the writing requirements as described in the syllabus and classroom assignments. The thesis proposal must provide a clear description of a question or problem and a proposed method of answering the question or solving the problem. Guidance on the format of the research seminar proposal and a sample proposal are contained in the APUS Thesis Manual. NOTE: This course may not be taken until all other courses are COMPLETED and student has a 3.0 GPA. THIS COURSE IS 16 WEEKS. (Prerequisite: HIST691)
Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/21/21 - 10/29/21 11/01/21 - 02/20/22 Fall 2021 Session K 16 Week session
06/28/21 - 12/03/21 12/06/21 - 03/27/22 Fall 2021 Session C 16 Week session
07/27/21 - 12/31/21 01/03/22 - 04/24/22 Winter 2022 Session A 16 Week session
08/31/21 - 02/04/22 02/07/22 - 05/29/22 Winter 2022 Session K 16 Week session
09/28/21 - 03/04/22 03/07/22 - 06/26/22 Winter 2022 Session C 16 Week session
10/26/21 - 04/01/22 04/04/22 - 07/24/22 Spring 2022 Session A 16 Week session

Courses Start Monthly

Next Courses Start Nov 1
Register by Oct 29

Admission Requirements

  • All AMU master's degree/graduate certificate programs require a bachelor’s degree (or higher) from an institution whose accreditation is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).
  • Please read all graduate admission requirements before applying to this program and be prepared to submit the required documentation.
  • There is no fee to complete the AMU admission application. View steps to apply.

Materials Cost

Technology fee: $65 per course | $0 for active-duty military, National Guard members, and Reservists.

Need Help?

Selecting the right program to meet your educational goals is a key step in ensuring a successful outcome. If you are unsure of which program to choose, or need more information, please contact an AMU admissions representative at 877-755-2787 or info@apus.edu.

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Consumer Information

Department of Education and State Disclosures

For information on costs, median debt, state licensure requirements and more, view the gainful employment disclosures and the program disclosures for Maryland residents.

1Alumni Graduated with No APUS-incurred Student Loan Debt As of December 31, 2020

Includes alumni who graduated with an associate, bachelor's, or master's degree from APUS. Student loan debt is defined as student loans and private education loans used for tuition, fees, living expenses, and book costs associated with courses taken at APUS. Many APUS students receive military tuition assistance and veterans education benefits, which are not student loan debt.

*Cost Per Credit Hour

To minimize out-of-pocket costs, U.S. active-duty servicemembers, their spouse/dependents, National Guard members, and Reservists receive a tuition grant that caps undergraduate, master's degree, and graduate certificate tuition at $250/credit hour. In addition, a university book grant provides no-cost textbooks and ebooks for all undergraduates and military-tuition-grant-eligible master’s-level students.
See all military student benefits.