Skip Navigation
 

PSYC305 - History and Systems of Psychology

Course Details

Course Code: PSYC305 Course ID: 3578 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This course examines the major antecedents of modern psychological theories and methodology. Course content focuses on the history of psychology as a field of scientific inquiry, including an overview of development of schools of thought, prominent figures, and key theories. (Prerequisite: PSYC101)





Prerequisites

Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
05/27/19 - 11/01/19 11/04/19 - 12/29/19 Fall 2019 Session I 8 Week session
06/24/19 - 11/29/19 12/02/19 - 01/26/20 Fall 2019 Session D 8 Week session
07/29/19 - 01/03/20 01/06/20 - 03/01/20 Winter 2020 Session B 8 Week session
08/26/19 - 01/31/20 02/03/20 - 03/29/20 Winter 2020 Session I 8 Week session
09/30/19 - 02/28/20 03/02/20 - 04/26/20 Winter 2020 Session D 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

1.) Examine the importance of studying the history of psychology.

2.) Investigate the foundations of psychology.

3.) Differentiate the founders of psychology and their contributions to the discipline.

4.) Examine the role of applied psychology in the 20th century.

5.) Explore the “society of psychology.”

Important Note on Academic Integrity and Plagiarism: All written assignments must be in the student’s own words, with content based on published materials paraphrased, source cited and referenced correctly per formatting rules of the American Psychological Association (APA). Failure to properly source credit (which includes placing any direct quotes inside quotation marks and placing source credits immediately after all quotes and paraphrasing, or summarizing what was read in the student’s own words), regardless of intent, constitutes plagiarism. Students may not copy any part of the reviewed journal article verbatim, with or without source crediting. ANY plagiarism found in any course assignments, including papers, essay tests and discussion forum posts, will result in a score of zero for the first incident and course failure for any subsequent instance, with, per APUS rules, the plagiarism reported to the Registrar’s Office for each event.

GRADED COURSEWORK

Forums

Weekly dialogue with classmates based on engagement with assigned course readings and/or related multi-media will take place in the online classroom on designated forums. While designed to promote lively discourse within a community of fellow learners, the dialogues are academic in nature and require a scholarly orientation.

ASSIGNMENTS

There are four assignments in this course, due in Weeks 3,4, 6 and 7.

Today in the History of Psychology (Week 3)

In this assignment, you will be examining the relationship between important historical dates and the current practice of psychology. You will select three dates (the month and day only) of importance to you from the Today in the History of Psychology Calendar. Using the worksheet for the assignment, provide a summary of the event (minimum word count 150 words). Then identify and explain three examples of how each event influenced the current practice of psychology (each example minimum word count 150 words).

Contributions to the Current Practice of Psychology (Week 6)

In this assignment, you will select an individual who has made important contributions to the history of psychology. A list of psychologists recognized by the American Psychological Association for Distinguished Scientific Contributions to psychology can be found here: http://www.apa.org/about/awards/scientific-contributions.aspx?tab=3

For this assignment, create a PowerPoint that includes a description of the life and work of your selected individual.

The PowerPoint will need to include the following information:

a) biographical information (2-3 slides)

b) papers and books authored by the individual (2 slides)

c) commentary by others about the nature and significance of this individual's work (2-3 slides)

d) evidence of the person’s influence in the current practice of psychology (5 slides)

e) description of how this individual’s work relates to your personal interests in psychology (4 slides)

Knowledge Review Worksheet (Weeks 4 and 7)

In these assignments, you will be discussing important historical concepts from the course. Using the provided worksheet, you will respond to each question with a minimum of 250 to a maximum of 300 words. The textbook is a required resource. You may include additional resources if you choose.

NameGrade %
Forums 32.00 %
Week 1 Forum 4.00 %
Week 2 Forum 4.00 %
Week 3 Forum 4.00 %
Week 4 Forum 4.00 %
Week 5 Forum 4.00 %
Week 6 Forum 4.00 %
Week 7 Forum 4.00 %
Week 8 Forum 4.00 %
Assignments 68.00 %
Week 3 Assignment: Today in the History of Psychology 16.00 %
Week 4 Assignment: Knowledge Review #1 16.00 %
Week 6 Assignment: Contributions to the Current Practice of Psychology 20.00 %
Week 7 Assignment: Knowledge Review #2 16.00 %
Book Title: Psychology: Pythagoras to Present -E-book available in the APUS Online Library; hard copy not available from the APUS Bookstore, please try other sources.
Author: Malone, John C.
Publication Info: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262516570
Book Title: To find the library e-book(s) req'd for your course, please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the eReserve by course #.
Author: No Author Specified
Publication Info:
ISBN: N/A
Book Title: The History of Psychology - available online, link provided in the course eReserve
Author:
Publication Info: Shippensburg University
ISBN: NTMO

Book Title:Psychology: Pythagoras to Present -E-book available in the APUS Online Library; hard copy not available from the APUS Bookstore, please try other sources.
ISBN:9780262516570
Publication Info:MIT Press
Author:Malone, John C.
Unit Cost:$33.43
Book Title:To find the library e-book(s) req'd for your course, please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the eReserve by course #.
Author: No Author Specified
Book Title:The History of Psychology - available online, link provided in the course eReserve
ISBN:NTMO
Publication Info:Shippensburg University

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.