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MILH411 - Diplomacy and War I

Course Details

Course Code: MILH411 Course ID: 3395 Credit Hours: 3 Level: Undergraduate

This course is a comprehensive international study of the struggles between and among states, beginning with ancient times and ending with the Congress of Vienna, and of the relationship between diplomacy and war in pursuing national objectives. (Prerequisite: HIST300/HS334 for History and Military History majors only)





Course Schedule

Registration Dates Course Dates Session Weeks
12/31/18 - 05/31/19 06/03/19 - 07/28/19 Spring 2019 Session D 8 Week session
03/25/19 - 08/30/19 09/02/19 - 10/27/19 Summer 2019 Session D 8 Week session

Current Syllabi

Students should be able to:

CO-1:

Identify: Appropriate primary and secondary sources used in the study of war and diplomacy in the western tradition (Comprehension)

Analyze: The literature (Primary and Secondary Sources) associated with Statecraft to identify patterns of practices of Statecraft to determine seeking points of convergence that suggest universal practice whether deliberate or incidental. (Analysis)

Evaluate: The practice of Statecraft as documented in the literature to determine why historical outcomes resulted either in peace or war (Evaluation)

CO-2:

Explain: The historic contextual variables of diplomacy, militarism, politics, economics, culture, and religion of the Western World from the Antiquity to the Treaty of Westphalia that contribute to a state’s foreign policy decision making process. (Comprehension)

Analyze: A state’s decision to pursue war or peace based on the historic contextual variables to determine causality. (Analysis)

Evaluate: A state’s decision to pursue war or peace based on the historic contextual variables and provide feedback based on the evaluation that either validates or rejects a state’s decision (Evaluation)

CO-3:

Describe: A state’s national security objectives (Comprehension) Explain: A state’s national security objectives (Comprehension) Analyze: A state’s national security objectives (Analysis) Evaluate: A state’s national security objectives (Evaluate)

CO-4:

Describe: A state’s practice of statecraft in a specific historical situation (Comprehension) Explain: A state’s practice of statecraft in a specific historical situation (Comprehension) Analyze: A state’s practice of statecraft in a specific historical situation (Analysis) Evaluate: A state’s practice of statecraft in a specific historical situation (Evaluate)

ASSIGNMENT SUBMISSION PROCEDURES

You will be uploading assignments in the ASSIGNMENT Tab located in the left too/menu bar. Click “browse” and then locate the file on your computer. Also, be sure to click the "submit for grading" box in the lower left hand corner. Following these directions will ensure that you have successfully uploaded your assignment by the title (Assignment One etc.), and this will prompt me to grade your assignment upon submission.

Do not submit in “Student Comment” section or as email attachment unless otherwise directed by me. If you are having problems with Sakai, you need to contact “Classroom Support”. There is a link in the left tool/menu bar. Sometimes Sakai does not work well with certain browsers. Consider trying another browser (Internet Explorer, Chrome, Firefox, Safari, etc.)

All written assignments (except Forum participation) must be submitted in Microsoft Word, anything other than Word cannot be opened, and the student will asked to resubmit and will result in a deduction in the student grade. Also, please do not upload zip files.

You do not need to email the instructor that you have submitted your assignments or made Forum participation postings unless specifically directed otherwise. Just go to the assignment link and click submit.

FORUMS – Initial Responses and Participation

Overview: Review the Forum question, consult suggested and acceptable discovered resources, think critically, and answer the question. Please stay within the word count. If you make your post too long, you will lose the interest of your peers.

Format: Initial Posts 300-400 words. If the word minimum is not achieved points will be docked.

Follow Up Question from Professor should be 250-350 words in length. If the word minimum is not achieved points will be docked.

Responses to your peers – Respond to two (2) of your peers in Weeks 2-8. Your responses should be 250-350 words in length. If the word minimum is not achieved points will be docked.

Substantive replies to other students or the instructor make up the Forum participation grade. Substantive replies go beyond “I agree,” or “I see your point” or merely restating what you and other students have already said (…”you are right Bill, George Washington DID have wooden teeth…”) in other portions of the discussion. Effective responses relate course readings, theory, research, or personal experience to the discussion topic. Use citations where appropriate to support your points (see Chicago/Turabian).

Rubric is as follows for Weeks 2-8:

Initial Post: 43 Points

Answer Follow Up Instructor Question: 12 points (***) Response to Classmate I – 15 Points

Response to Classmate II – 15 Points

Formatting – 7 Points

Bibliography – 8 Points

(Spelling and grammar do count, you will be deducted these points if errors are found. Word count does count;

you will be deducted 5 points for not making each post requirement)

Submission: Enter the appropriate group under the “Forum” button on the left navigation bar. Post your response in

the discussion board area for your classmates to read and respond to the postings of other classmates.

Initial Response is due on Friday.

Instructor will ask questions either on Friday, Saturday or Sunday (in many instances sooner). Do not email the instructor asking when they will respond to you.

You should respond to your peers by Sunday.

You should answer instructor follow up question by Monday of the New Week.

If you post your initial response after 11:59PM Friday Night, you will not get an instructor response; those 12

points will be lost.

*** Those who ask for an extension, instructor follow up questions will not be given and you will be required to respond to three (3) of your classmates posts.

**INSTRUCTOR EXPECTATIONS REGARDING SUBMISSION QUALITY

Please use complete sentences and check both the spelling and grammar of your Forum participation postings. Also, you must make your discussion postings to the appropriate week. For example, do not try to go back and make postings to Week One when we are in the middle of Week Four. Do not make advance postings either. Discussion postings made outside of the current week will not be counted for points. “Weeks” will begin on Monday and end at midnight, Sunday. Assignments and forums are due on different days, so you need to be mindful of these dates.

Do not copy and paste definitions from Wikipedia or articles from other websites and post them for discussion / participation credit. You will receive zero points if you do this and be reported to the Office of the Registrar as a violator of the university Academic Honesty policy (see student handbook). All assignment and Forum submissions should be original student work, properly cited and formatted in accordance with The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS).

BOOK REVIEW AND ANALYSIS

Overview: Complete scholarly thesis review and analysis of a historically significant treatise, theses or book on War and Diplomacy.

Subject: The Review and Analysis will be based on a book selected from the list provided in the LESSON section and ASSIGNMENT tab in the left menu bar. The student may select an alternate work to review with instructor approval. You may wish to select a work that will support your research for your final paper.

Grading Criteria: The comparative essay review will be graded according to the following essential elements:

- Author background and historical context

- Author’s thesis. Define and identify supporting points made by the author.

- Analysis of author’s thesis. Does it make sense? Why or why not? Are there any flaws in the author’s

logic? What are they?

- Have the points made by the author endured to date? Provide historical examples of practice and application if appropriate.

- Formatting (Formal academic document using CMS).

- Bibliography

- Page length requirement

Spelling and grammar do count and points will be deducted from your final grade for lax application of the elements of style.

Format: The Book Review and Analysis will be Three (3) to Six (6) text pages using Times New Roman 12 point font and be double-spaced throughout. Include a Chicago Manual Style formatted cover/title page and bibliography (do not apply to page count) as appropriate.

Style: The Book Review and Analysis Essay must be written as a “scholarly narrative;” that is, it should be written like an essay you have read for the course with grammatically correct sentence and paragraph structure. Transitions from one idea to another should be smooth. Do NOT divide your review with sub-headings, numbers, and sub-titles or double-space between paragraphs.

Scholarly Research Paper

Grading Criteria: The Scholarly Research Paper will be graded according to the following essential elements: 1) Focus based on an Academic “how” or “why” question that helps define the area of inquiry 2) A definitive Thesis Statement that directly answers the Academic Research Question; 3) Presentation of research based proof from credible, valid, and reliable sources that support the Thesis Statement accompanied by reflective analysis, 4) timely submission and adherence to the Scholarly Research Paper Instructions, appropriate conventions of style and grammar, presented using Chicago Manual of Style/Turabian formatting to include Title Page (no Abstract), appropriate footnote citations for facts, information, and quotes, and a bibliography.

Format: The Scholarly Research Paper will be a minimum of EIGHT (8) text pages using, but not including Title Page or Bibliography (front or back matter), Times New Roman 12 point font and be double-spaced throughout in the Chicago/Turabian format. There is no requirement for an abstract. Do not divide the paper into titled sections with sub-headings.

Style: The Scholarly Research Paper must be written as a “historical narrative;” that is, it should be written like a

book or essay you have read for the course with grammatically correct sentence and paragraph structure.

Transitions from one idea to another should be smooth. Do not divide your paper with sub-headings, numbers, and sub-titles or double-space between paragraphs.

Overview: Complete scholarly research on your topic. There are countless “reports” that recount the facts surrounding events and to add another to the number is pointless. Historical research writing should add to the body of the literature by considering a topic from a new angle rather than retelling an oft-told tale. The question is the tool used to accomplish this. Develop a question and your research is to answer this question.

Subject: The Scholarly Research Paper will answer a question posed by YOU the researcher on some aspect of War and Diplomacy, process, or historical events THAT YOU SELECT. Suggestions for ideas may be found in your readings, their table of contents, bibliographic essay, or from your academic readings in or outside the classroom. You will present a Proposal (2-3 pages) that identifies your Academic Question and Thesis, an introduction paragraph that integrates your question and thesis, a tentative alpha-numeric Outline, and a working list of a minimum of 5 valid reliable Primary or Secondary sources formatted in accordance with a Turabian/Chicago Manual Style bibliography.

Grading Criteria: The Scholarly Research Paper will be graded according to the following essential elements: 1) Focus based on an Academic “how” or “why” question that helps define the area of inquiry 2) A definitive Thesis Statement that directly answers the Academic Research Question; 3) Presentation of research based proof from credible, valid, and reliable sources that support the Thesis accompanied by reflective analysis, 4) timely submission and adherence to the Scholarly Research Paper Instructions, appropriate conventions of style and grammar, presented using Chicago Manual of Style/Turabian formatting to include Title Page (no Abstract), appropriate footnote citations for facts, information, and quotes, and a bibliography.

Submission: Submit assignment to the Assignment Area located in the left toolbar/menu.

FINAL EXAM Overview: The Final Exam will consist of a series of four, essay format questions each worth 25%

of the exam’s total grade. It will not be proctored.

Subject: The Final Exam will be comprehensive and will require you to demonstrate your knowledge of the course material.

Grading Criteria: Follow the Final Exam instructions and respond to the essay questions. The essays should introduce the topic with a thesis statement, have a body that presents one or more supporting points from your sources formatted in accordance with Chicago/Turabian, and a conclusion statement. Essays should be between 300 and 600 words in length and include all the essential elements referenced above. The student is expected to use the appropriate elements of style and grammar.

Submission: Access “Exams” on the course menu in the left menu bar and take the Final Exam. It will be open the entire week.

NameGrade %
Final Exam 20.00 %
Final 20.00 %
Forums 52.00 %
Week 1 Forum 2.60 %
Week 2 Forum 5.72 %
Week 3 Forum 7.80 %
Week 4 Forum 7.80 %
Week 5 Forum 5.72 %
Week 6 Forum 7.80 %
Week 7 Forum 5.72 %
Week 8 Forum 5.72 %
Week 8 Project Forum 3.12 %
Research Paper Info 28.00 %
Research Paper Outline (Proposal) 8.40 %
Research topic 2.80 %
Research Paper 16.80 %

Required Text:

· There is a list with the syllabus that gives you all the readings for this class, please make sure you have this. There will be links in each Lesson module as well.

IMPORTANT NOTE: The Department of History and Military History requires conformity with the traditional University of Chicago Style Manual and its Turabian offshoot. Citations will follow traditional footnote / endnote attribution. Do not use parenthetical (APA / MLA) variations. Students in History and Military History classes cannot use Wikipedia or encyclopedias – this includes online encyclopedias. Sites with advertisements or pop-ups also should be avoided. “Googling” is not “Research”. The school’s library is one of the finest electronic reference resources available in the industry and you are encouraged to avail yourself of its comprehensive collection. If you need assistance please let me know. The AMU/APU online library is a critically acclaimed, state of the art information resource with subscriptions to an extensive collection of databases and journals. Other outstanding resources accessed simply through Google include Project Gutenberg and the Avalon Project at Yale University. These sources provide access to primary source documents and books for free in the public domain.

Recommended References:

The APUS Online Library, in the Tutorial & Student Studies Center provides a link to the Chicago Style Manual –

Online. If you are majoring in History or Military History, then it is highly recommended that you purchase a bound version of this style manual because you will need to be required to follow this citation manual in all of your History, Military History and Military Studies courses.

Microsoft Word (if you do not have MS Word, please save all files as a Rich Text Format (.rtf). NOTE - The classroom only supports .doc, .docx, and .rtf files. Please visit Adobe for a free copy of Adobe Reader.

Book Title:Various resources from the APUS Library & the Open Web are used. Please visit http://apus.libguides.com/er.php to locate the course eReserve.
Author: No Author Specified

Previous Syllabi

Not current for future courses.