Master of Arts in Homeland Security-Capstone Option

 

DEGREE AT A GLANCE:

    • Number of Credits
    • 36
    • Cost Per Credit
    • $ 325
    • Total Tuition*
    • $ 11,700
  • *(Before Transfer Credit)
 

Program Description

This degree is designed to provide broad coverage of the major homeland security threats, organization, and challenges through course study in homeland defense, intelligence and homeland security, terrorism, consequence management, and interagency government issues. Students may select courses based on their professional, personal, or research interests including weapons of mass destruction, crisis management, narcotics as a homeland security issue, terrorism, security management, intelligence methods, transportation security, information security, emergency management, and public health. Students must take HLSS500 as the first required course in this program.

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Program Objectives

HLSS699 - Master’s Capstone Seminar in Homeland Security

In addition to the institutional and degree level outcomes objectives, this degree seeks the following specific learning outcomes of its graduates. Graduates in this degree program will be able to:

  • Evaluate specific domestic security challenges for the 21st Century that face the United States and other industrialized nations.
  • Evaluate and propose changes at federal, state, and/or local levels, to reflect the evolving strategic policy issues associated with a statutory and presidential direction for homeland security.
  • Recognize terrorist groups’ proclivities in order to forecast the risks, types, and orders of magnitude of terrorist threats most likely to confront the nation-state.
  • Define and describe by example the statutory, policy, strategy and legal differences between homeland security and homeland defense. Describe the roles/missions of USNORTHCOM, and the DSCA mission, compare and contrast these with the DHS mission.
  • Recognize the interdisciplinary nature of Homeland Security functions and be able to assess and integrate various functional areas
  • Evaluate existing policies, procedures and protocols by DHS and inter-agency community to allow seamless agency integration through prevention, protection, incident response and recovery scenarios. Validate literal and procedural alignment / compliance with the National Response Framework, National Incident Management System, and Homeland Security Presidential Directives (HSPDs).

Master of Homeland Security

American Military University is part of American Public University System, an accredited university offering more than 180 degree and certificate programs at the undergraduate and graduate level. All courses are online, so students have the flexibility of taking classes any time or any place that fits their schedule. Our degree programs are designed to be challenging and relevant to working adults in both the public and private sectors and can help enhance their current career or prepare them for a career change.

Students come to our university from across the globe with varying educational backgrounds and diverse educational and career goals. Choose the category below that best describes you:

Our 5-step admissions process will allow you to apply for admission, complete your new student orientation, request a transfer credit evaluation, apply for Federal Student Aid, and register for classes. Get started today!

Have Questions?
Our admissions staff is available Monday - Thursday from 8:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m. and Friday from 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. ET to answer your questions and provide assistance with the admissions process. You can reach us by phone at 877-777-9081, e-mail us at info@apus.edu, or connect with us via Live Chat.

 
 
 
General Total Credits - 36 Hours
Core Requirements
18 Hours
NAME
DESCRIPTION
CREDITS
HLSS500
Research Methods in Homeland Security
3 hours

This course provides basic research methods skills for addressing homeland security studies problems and issues. Students focus on the detailed procedures for conducting qualitative case studies. Students become well versed in research planning, secondary data collection, and qualitative data analysis methods and how these methods relate to the larger field of social science research. This course prepares students for intermediate and advanced security and intelligence methods.

HLSS502
Homeland Security and Defense
3 hours

This course offers a comprehensive overview of key elements of the United States’ homeland security program. This overview will have students examining, discussing and analyzing homeland security operational and policy concerns which have continued to evolve in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and the creation of the Department of Homeland Security.

HLSS505
Security Risk Management
3 hours

This course introduces students to risk management components including plans and strategies to mitigate risk. Students in this course will examine the role of risk management at the strategic and enterprise levels in the prevention of loss and mitigation of consequences through risk identification and control. This course will allow students to develop and apply risk management techniques to include selection of risk management measures and implementation of those measures.

HLSS523
Domestic Terrorism and Extremist Groups
3 hours

This course traces the history, emergence, and growth of domestic terrorist and extremist groups within the United States. Students will assess various groups' intentions, capabilities, and activities within contexts of and ramifications on political, national security, and legal paradigms.

INTL613
Intelligence and Homeland Security
3 hours

This course examines intelligence community responses to threats to the U.S. homeland from transnational and domestic actors. Threats to the U.S. borders, including illegal immigration, narcotics smuggling, money laundering, commercial smuggling, and other organized crime activities are also covered.

LSTD516
Homeland Security and the Law
3 hours

This course is provides an understanding of the structure of homeland security law and policy. This course will familiarize students with the extensive and complex legal codes that come under the heading of Homeland Security. The course will cover statutes, policy papers, presidential directives, and other documents related to homeland security allowing for an in-depth examination of the foundations of homeland security. The course will provide the student with important legal guidance allowing the student to accurately interpret, understand, and apply homeland security law and policy. The course provides a detailed overview of the subject of homeland security and includes definitions of homeland security, terrorism, the related law, and its development. The course discusses homeland security in other countries as well i.e. Europe, China, Japan.


Concentration Requirements
12 Hours
NAME
DESCRIPTION
CREDITS
BUSN602
Managerial Analysis
3 hours

This course introduces fundamental concepts of accounting principles, financial tools, and economic analysis for effective managerial decision-making. Topics include the role of the financial manager in the organization, concepts, and principles underlying financial accounting practices, financial statement analysis, budgeting, and economic analysis for decision makers.

BUSN603
Quantitative Analysis
3 hours

This course explores management problems and the role of decision-making models and tools in resolving business problems. The application and use of information systems in decision-making is assessed. Students apply system and quantitative analysis to an integrated case study.

BUSN620
Strategic Management
3 hours

This course is a culmination of the business functions to incorporate them into a coherent, profitable, sustainable business strategy. This course includes strategy information, decisions, and techniques of industry leaders. This is an upper-level course and should be taken after completion of the FINC, ECON, and MKTG required courses.

BUSN625
Applied Decision Making
3 hours

This is a course in business analysis. This course investigates the advanced analysis methods and techniques used to solve modern business problems. The course emphasizes the most successful methods from business statistics, production and operations management, management science, and operations research fields of study. Students will be required to synthesize material from several major fields of study in order to apply it in this course. The capabilities of Microsoft Office will be used extensively throughout the course to illustrate the application of these methods and techniques to the analysis and solution of modern business problems. The course will first investigate the types of problems faced by businesses in the both the production and service areas. Methods of analysis will be investigated to solve these type problems including probability concepts and their applications, statistical quality control, process design, forecasting, inventory control, waiting line models, transportation and assignment methods, decision analysis, and simulation modeling.

CMRJ620
Policing and Corrections in Homeland Security
3 hours

This course explores the evolving role of police and corrections in homeland security. Students will assess threats and counter-terrorism strategies specific to police and correctional facilities while examining best practices in the field.

EDMG509
Interagency Disaster Management
3 hours

This course deals with the interaction, coordination, and facilitation between federal, state, and local agencies during preparation, response, and recovery operations. The history of emergency response organizational development is explored, along with the current structural and operational design provided by the National Response Framework (NRF) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS). Finally, the potential for public-private partnerships in disaster response is examined. Students will achieve an understanding of how all of the various agencies work together to achieve emergency management and disaster response goals and objectives.

EDMG515
Hazard Mitigation and Resilient Communities
3 hours

This course provides an overview of what is known about natural hazards, disasters, recovery, and mitigation, how research findings have been translated into policies and programs; and a sustainable hazard mitigation research agenda. The course also provides an examination of past disaster losses and hazards management over the past 50 years, including factors--demographic, climate, social--that influence loss.

EDMG565
Consequence Management: Terrorism Preparation & Response
3 hours

This course addresses the potential results from nuclear, biological, and chemical incidents or uses. Topics include public health consequences of such incidents, emergency planning and response measures in place among U.S. agencies, and emerging detection and management technologies. Existing vulnerabilities to these types of incidents and attacks will also be discussed.

EDMG612
Risk Communications
3 hours

This course examines necessary communication that must be provided by public officials before and during emergencies and disasters in order to protect the public and achieve understanding and cooperation. Specific theories of emergency and disaster communication are examined. The communication surrounding several recent disaster events is analyzed, and students write a press briefing or press release for one of these cases. Finally, students engage in a forum discussion of a disaster of their choice, appropriately titled: ‘the good, the bad, and the totally clueless.’ Students achieve an enhanced ability to deal with the media and the public before and during crisis situations, which is an extremely valuable skill to have.

HLSS522
Weapons of Mass Destruction and the New Terrorism
3 hours

This course explores the threat of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) as a unique phenomenon within the homeland security landscape. Specifically, this course provides students with a historical perspective on the development and use of WMD from both an international and a domestic perspective. The course also explores the efforts to prevent, prepare, and respond to the use of WMDs.

HLSS645
Port Security
3 hours

This course will survey the critical importance of ports to trade, their vulnerability to disruption and attack, and defensive measures to mitigate risk focusing on international cooperation and legislation. Special emphasis will be placed on defensive measures to protect ports from disruption or asymmetric attack, international cooperation, and national legislation.

INTL501
Strategic Intelligence
3 hours

RECOMMENDED AS SECOND PROGRAM COURSE. This course examines the current structure, function, capabilities, and contributions of individual U.S. national intelligence community members. Students appraise the intelligence cycle by an overview of the intelligence planning, collection, exploitation, analysis, production, and dissemination phases. The course also evaluates the intelligence oversight system, the restrictions on national intelligence community activities prescribed by federal law, executive and agency directives.

INTL502
Collection
3 hours

This course is a study of intelligence collection and information gathering. It focuses on a variety of aspects related to how both the United States and foreign nations gather and process intelligence. The student will develop a comprehensive understanding of the role collection plays in the intelligence community, how various policies affect collection, and how different intelligence agencies monitor and collect intelligence.

INTL506
Analytics II
3 hours

This course provides an overview of intelligence analysis. It first explores the nature of human thought processes: why we think the way we do, and the many analytical, perceptual, and cognitive errors we frequently make in conducting our own analysis. The student is also provided a foundation from which to understand and conduct critical analysis. With this foundation, students are then given a series of historical case studies to examine and analyze.

INTL507
Intelligence Operations
3 hours

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of intelligence operations. The course will focus on the intelligence resources necessary to carry out the full range of intelligence operations using the tools, techniques, and resources available to intelligence agencies.

INTL604
Interagency Operations
3 hours

This course provides insight on how to improve interagency relationships among security, defense, and intelligence agencies. This course introduces the student to theoretical and practical material for understanding the behavior of individual organizations and what can be done to make organizations work more closely together at the federal, state, and local levels. Emphasis is placed on explaining why organizations act the way they do and how to improve interagency coordination.

INTL621
Signals Intelligence (SIGINT)
3 hours

This course examines Signals Intelligence focusing on the underlying technology of SIGINT and its application to various military and civilian intelligence questions. This course will also address contemporary issues related to the Cyber-SIGINT nexus as well as the lesser-known disciplines of MASINT, FISINT, etc. Collection platforms will be studied in relation to their inherent capabilities and application against various intelligence targets. The course is held at the unclassified, open-source level.

INTL646
Transnational Crime and Narcotics
3 hours

This course will provide an overview of transnational crime and narcotics and its effects on national security, political, social, and economic development of countries around the world. The focus of this class will be the proliferation and expanding influence of organized crime groups, the increasing links among crime groups, corruption, and links to terrorism from transnational crime and narcotics. This class will examine the diverse dimensions of transnational crime and narcotics in the context of increasing globalization and the exponential impact of technology advances

INTL647
Cyber Intelligence
3 hours

This course is a study of Cyber Intelligence from its nascent stages to its current operational and policy impact. Students will explore the full range of cyber capabilities from exploitation to defense including several case studies that demonstrate the challenges and benefits of cyber intelligence operations. The course will demonstrate how cyber has changed the nature of intelligence collection, operations, and analysis across the US Intelligence and Defense communities.

INTL650
Counterterrorism
3 hours

This course is a study of the evolution of intelligence and counterterrorism while analyzing U.S. and international policies for combating terrorism, terrorist tactics worldwide, and the scope of terrorism in the twenty-first century. The course focuses on the problems presented by terrorism to U.S. national security, suggested political solutions, and alternatives to the current counterterrorism policy.

INTL652
Terrorism: Assessing the Past to Forecast the Future
3 hours

This course will expose the students to a variety of counter-terrorism intelligence methodologies and analytic tools, and extensive academic, government, policy literature on the challenges, opportunities, and assumptions related to forecasting terrorism. The course will provide students with the analytic capability to understand the types of terrorist threats that are most likely to confront the U.S. and its allies, in addition to challenging students to evaluate the efficacy and impact of prediction-based efforts in counter-terrorism intelligence.

INTL655
Intelligence and Weapons of Mass Destruction
3 hours

This course focuses on Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD). Students will evaluate this national security threat from a variety of perspectives and will analyze various agencies response capabilities to a WMD attack within the United States. Competing definitions of WMD will be scrutinized and students will evaluate current US intelligence strategies used to prevent a WMD attack. Finally, students will explore how intelligence can be used in a post-attack situation.

ISSC630
Advanced Cybercrime Analysis
3 hours

The global reach of the Internet, the low cost of online activity, and the relative anonymity of users has led to an increase in computer related crimes. This course focuses on cybercrime investigation and prevention; it appraises the legal issues related to on-line criminal conduct, the collection of electronic evidence, and the onslaught of new technology. This course also analyzes the phases, processes, and challenges of cybercrime investigations, and it examines technical, legal, and social issues relating to the search and seizure of digital evidence and computer forensics. Students will encounter the challenges of the latency between technology and the law.

ISSC631
Cyber Ethics: Privacy and Intellectual Property
3 hours

This course is an advanced study of information ethics, cyber privacy, and intellectual property. It examines the ethical, economic, and societal issues that face today’s information-entrenched society; this includes intellectual property rights, privacy, accessibility and censorship. The explosive growth of information technology, the increased competition in the global marketplace, and the surge in the use of information to protect society from terrorism has led to the unintended erosion of fundamental rights and values. This course appraises the current state of information ethics, the dangers and opportunities presented by information technology, and the potential solutions to the inherent risks in today’s information-bound society.

ISSC642
Intrusion Detection and Incident Handling
3 hours

This course examines the tenets of Intrusion Detection, Intrusion Prevention, and Incident Handling. Intrusion Detection focuses on the methods to detect attempts (attacks or intrusions) to compromise the confidentiality, integrity or availability of an information system. Also included is an analysis of the principles and practices of intrusion detection, intrusion prevention, and incident handling; network-based, host-based, and hybrid intrusion detection; identifying attack patterns; deployment of resources and responses to handle the incident, surveillance, damage assessment, risk assessment, data forensics, data mining, attack tracing, system recovery, and continuity of operation.

LSTD502
Criminal Law
3 hours

This course focuses on the fundamental principals, concepts, and development of criminal law and the constitutional provisions which govern it. The course further discusses the relationship of the individual to the state and includes an examination of the general framework of criminal law as a means of social control.

LSTD512
Immigration Law
3 hours

This graduate course focuses on the procedural and substantive law surrounding immigration. Emphasis is given to legal changes enacted in the field since September 11, 2001, as well as current events. It provides students with the background, processes, and tools necessary for a working knowledge of immigration issues. Important topics such as immigrant status, citizenship, refugees, and asylum seekers will be explored. Students will analyze immigration law and policy.

LSTD515
Admiralty Law
3 hours

Ships carry 90 percent of the world’s 5.1 billion tons per year of international trade. In addition, coastwise shipping between US ports transports over one billion tons of cargo annually. This massive international and domestic trade includes a U.S.-flag cargo fleet made up of more than 40,000 vessels that represent over $48 billion in private investment. To facilitate this commerce, federal courts and Congress have created a comprehensive body of uniform admiralty law that governs navigation and shipping. This course will examine that body of law. Topics will include jurisdiction, maritime liens, charter parties, bills of lading, remedies for injury and wrongful death, sovereign immunity, collisions, limitations on liability, and salvage.

LSTD517
Law, Ethics and Cybersecurity
3 hours

This course focuses on the ways that law, ethics and cybersecurity overlap and intersect. Besides laws related to cybersecurity, the course examines laws related to intellectual property, civil litigation, criminal prosecutions, and privacy. This examination will provide the means to identify and analyze the policies reflected in those laws. Those policies could guide the creation of policies on a business-level, using qualitative risk assessment and planning. An exploration of ethics and cybersecurity, as well as of workplace ethics, will involve the use of an ethical framework.

MGMT605
Leadership
3 hours

This course covers the elements of contemporary leadership and delineates the principles that are important in the development of a leader for the 21st century. Discussion of the role and function of leadership will include an in-depth analysis and study of needs impacting individuals, organizations and society. The course provides students with a set of leadership skills and competencies on which to build an individual model for effective leadership that can be tested over time.

NSEC506
Cyber Policy and Practice in National Security
3 hours

This course will provide an overview of current cyber policy and strategy for non-practitioners in a national security framework. Students will study the cyber threat environment; laws and policies that govern cyber security; current and historical structure, functions, and capabilities of private and governmental agencies comprising the cyber community; and future trends that affect national security

NSEC614
Political Psychology of Terror Groups
3 hours

This course focuses on analyzing terror groups from a political psychological perspective. In particular, the course approaches terror groups from two different political psychological perspectives, individual and group processes. Together these two perspectives provide a solid foundation from which to understand terror groups.

PADM530
Public Policy
3 hours

This course examines the way government policies emerge from the political process and are implemented through participating institutions. In this class students will investigate how good analysis can contribute to informed policy-making and review the factors that go into developing effective implementation strategies. In addition, today’s need for enhanced public accountability and the challenging problems of measuring program performance are examined.

PBHE605
Quarantine
3 hours

This course is a study of the theoretical, historical, and contemporary issues associated with quarantine as a public health and safety measure. Students will learn of quarantine strategy, implementation, effectiveness, and debate. The course topics will include consideration of quarantine as a health and safety measure in the modern homeland security strategy.

PBHE606
Disaster Health Management
3 hours

This course focuses on the principles, types, and forms of health management systems that exist to serve public needs during society’s most threatening crises. Topics range from international and national political and policy views of disaster health management down to local levels where leading hospitals and emergency managers must respond to public health disasters on a daily basis.

SCMT537
Computer Crime
3 hours

This course will examine cybercrime and the legal, social and technical issues cybercrime presents. With a multi-disciplinary perspective, we will focus on ways information technology is used to commit crimes, investigative techniques used to discover the crimes, and the challenges involved in prosecuting cybercrimes These challenges include jurisdictional issues, application of traditional laws to cybercrimes, and privacy issues encountered during prevention, investigation and prosecution.

SCMT544
Security Architecture
3 hours

THIS COURSE WILL REQUIRE A PROCTORED EXAM. This course stresses the core principles of the CPTED (Crime Prevention through Environmental Design) concept. Students learn how to work with architects, city, and municipal planners to ensure new or refurbished construction is designed in such a way as to minimize or eliminate criminal activity. Topics covered include initial planning considerations, gathering information from multiple sources, formulating and implementing the plan based on core CPTED principles, and the need for modifications and review over time.

SCMT545
Airport Security Design
3 hours

This course provides a comprehensive overview of the current state-of-the-art in airport security. Air terminal security is covered from the aspect of physical security considerations, baggage screening, training requirements for security personnel, employee screening and awareness programs, aircraft security, ground and air security technologies, integrating security systems for maximum coverage and protection, effective local, state, and federal liaison, counter and anti-terrorism measures, narcotics and contraband - the use of working dog teams, and apron access and security considerations.

TLMT600
National Transportation Management
3 hours

This course aligns transportation management with a comprehensive overview of intermodal transportation and logistics management. We will look at recent trends in the field and its important stakeholders. Business logistics/supply chain will be viewed from managerial perspectives impacting physical distribution, materials management, transportation management, and logistics and supply chain management. The course covers the planning, organizing, and controlling of these activities including sub-activities such as transportation basics, inventory and location strategies.

TLMT605
Cargo Security Management
3 hours

This course is designed to address the multi-billion dollar annual loss globally due to cargo theft. Topics include: asset protection in the transportation industry, analysis of freight system vulnerability, development of an effective cargo security plan, review of industry standards, and best practices in the industry.

TLMT607
Port and Terminal Operations
3 hours

An in-depth look at the workings of maritime port operations and intermodal transportation systems. Course topics include the governance and administration of ports and marine terminals, the role of regulatory agencies, navigation and safety, port operations and development including the process to fund and carry out dredging projects. Cargo handling for containers and dry and liquid bulk operations will be discussed along with a look at productivity of terminal operations. Comparisons will be made with other regions of the world. A review of major steamship lines, their trading patterns and future trends among the industry will be covered along with technological advances in vessels and terminal operating equipment. A strong emphasis will be placed on current issues in port policy.


Final Program Requirement
3 Hours
NAME
DESCRIPTION
CREDITS
HLSS699
Master's Capstone in Homeland Security
3 hours

The Master’s Capstone Seminar option in Homeland Security is a 16 week course that must be taken after all other courses in your program are complete and it cannot be taken concurrently with other courses. Capstone courses are NOT included in the university retake policy. All grades for any capstone attempts will appear on transcript and will be calculated in GPA


Graduate Electives
3 Hours
Electives are typically courses available at your degree level that are not currently required as a part of your degree program/academic plan. Please visit the catalog to view a complete listing of courses.

Total Credits (36 Hours)
Program Completion Rates, Median Debt and More

View more details regarding our graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed the program, and other important information.

 

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